July 16, 2014
mikeph:

Tim Rysdale, Crested Butte 1981

mikeph:

Tim Rysdale, Crested Butte 1981

July 12, 2014
bikefukr:

this was fancy fred’s, now its joe ball’s!

bikefukr:

this was fancy fred’s, now its joe ball’s!

(Source: therubbishbin)

July 8, 2014

satans-advocate:

sext: i want to pay bills and share household duties and approach our late 20’s in a financially and emotionally stable way with you

(via femputations)

July 6, 2014

bromaprieta:

If this is how you folks make art, its fucking depressing

(Source: thedandiestlandscape, via kiddten)

June 29, 2014
"

Social scientists estimate that 15 to 30 percent, or, “[a]s many as 600,000 to 1.2 million slaves” in antebellum America were Muslims. 46 percent of the slaves in the antebellum South were kidnapped from Africa’s western regions, which boasted “significant numbers of Muslims”.

These enslaved Muslims strove to meet the demands of their faith, most notably the Ramadan fast, prayers, and community meals, in the face of comprehensive slave codes that linked religious activity to insubordination and rebellion. Marking Ramadan as a “new American tradition” not only overlooks the holy month observed by enslaved Muslims many years ago, but also perpetuates their erasure from Muslim-American history.

Although the Quran “[a]llows a believer to abstain from fasting if he or she is far from home or involved in strenuous work,” many enslaved Muslims demonstrated transcendent piety by choosing to fast while bonded. In addition to abstaining from food and drink, enslaved Muslims held holy month prayers in slave quarters, and put together iftars - meals at sundown to break the fast - that brought observing Muslims together. These prayers and iftars violated slave codes restricting assembly of any kind.

For instance, the Virginia Slave Code of 1723 considered the assembly of five slaves as an “unlawful and tumultuous meeting”, convened to plot rebellion attempts. Every state in the south codified similar laws barring slave assemblages, which disparately impacted enslaved African Muslims observing the Holy Month.

Therefore, practicing Islam and observing Ramadan and its fundamental rituals, for enslaved Muslims in antebellum America, necessitated the violation of slave codes. This exposed them to barbaric punishment, injury, and oftentimes, even death. However, the courage to observe the holy month while bonded, and in the face of grave risk, highlights the supreme piety of many enslaved Muslims.

Ramadan was widely observed by enslaved Muslims. Yet, this history is largely ignored by Muslim American leaders and laypeople alike - and erased from the modern Muslim American narrative.

"

Ramadan: A centuries-old American tradition (via ailurophobicailurophile)

(Source: simhasanam, via thcoralsea)

June 29, 2014

(Source: andlatitude, via feelgauche)

June 20, 2014

(Source: worldcyclist, via macaroni-ho)

June 19, 2014

Anonymous said: Yo porn is racist as fuck and sexist as fuck but it doesn't have to be. Actually nothing has to be racist or sexist as fuck.

yoisthisracist:

And yet, here we fucking are.

June 18, 2014

Anonymous said: I don't know a lot about the Muslim religion. So out of curiosity; from the little to nothing I know and see, it's oppressive to women.. And I gathered you were a feminist? I don't mean this in a nasty way.. But just genuinely curious about how a feminist can then choose to suddenly become a muslim?? I'm sorry if I sound ignorant, which I probably do. I mean no offense.

thcoralsea:

Firstly I want to say that when you question two important parts of who I am and my identity, and state that they cannot coexist, you are challenging who I am as a person, and when you tell me that something as dear to me as my religion is oppressing me as a woman, not only is it hard to hear for myself and for my own purposes, but I am reminded of the countless times that people have used misconceptions about Islam to oppress Muslims, and in particular, the times that this very misconception has been used to harm and even kill my brother’s in Islam.

I understand that you mean no offense, and I understand that you are curious, but it’s important to me that you know that I find this question upsetting and distressing, but please don’t take that to mean that I am angry or upset at you specifically.

But none the less, I will give you the short answer(s):

Islam does not oppress women. There are, of course, occasions when Muslims oppress women, but these are in no way justified by the Qur’an or by the Sunnah. If you want to look at Islam, it’s important that you look at the sources, not at the people. People are fallible, imperfect. There is, no longer, no such thing as a perfect Muslim. We all sin, we all misinterpret. Look at the Qur’an, and at the Hadith. There is no sexism nor misogyny in Islam.

Muslims and Islam have been utilised as a scapegoat by the West for a long time. Much of it is deliberate, in the same way that anti-semitism or racism is deliberate. The vast majority of the media will tell you that Islam is sexist. That Islam is oppressive. These are lies. It is not.

Feminism has progressed in very different ways in different countries. In the West, particularly in English speaking countries, wearing less and less clothing has been a part of feminism, in other countries, with other religions it has not. There is no one right way and there is no wrong way to approach feminism. Different cultures, different religions approach it differently. Many things about Islam and about the way Muslims approach feminism is in direct conflict of the way that the West approaches feminism.This does not mean, in any way, that Muslims are not feminists. It does also not mean, in any way, that Western women are not feminists. What it means is that feminism is different for everyone, everywhere.

If you have specific questions I would be happier to answer those, big questions are hard for me to answer, because I don’t really know exactly what it is you’re asking.

June 18, 2014

(Source: thestarmichael, via therubbishbin)

June 18, 2014

velobay:

1949 Automoto 650B Randonneur

This is a nice example of handcrafted 650B randonneur bicycle, in the true spirit from the golden age of French production during the 1950’s. Automoto is an important trade in the bicycle story in France. Features a nice Nervex-lugged Vitus frame with a nice patina.

Final Price: $850.00 (1 bid)

June 17, 2014

asakiyume:

First photo (by Jonathan Levinson): Latifa Nabizada, Afghanistan’s first woman military helicopter pilot, and her daughter Malalai, who flies with her. Second photo (by Armando Perez) shows them with other women honored for their service. 

(via afghanistaninphotos)

June 16, 2014
idealbike:

Rivendell Hunqapillar built up for Touring. by Devil.Bunny http://flic.kr/p/8JgVgP

idealbike:

Rivendell Hunqapillar built up for Touring. by Devil.Bunny http://flic.kr/p/8JgVgP

June 15, 2014
twotoneatl:

Ok, ok. There was this one gravel climb that a few tried to conquer but no one came close to topping @rkhemmingsen’s ascent. He scaled this wall on a pair of #lightweight wheels. Key to his success?? ; )

twotoneatl:

Ok, ok. There was this one gravel climb that a few tried to conquer but no one came close to topping @rkhemmingsen’s ascent. He scaled this wall on a pair of #lightweight wheels. Key to his success?? ; )

June 14, 2014
sheer-powder:

“We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 
A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.
To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.
For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.
I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. “
—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool

sheer-powder:

We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 

A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.

To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.

For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.

I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. “

—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool

(via clitzy)

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